Posted Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 by & filed under FAQs.

A basic introduction to natural filtering of water can be found on-line at the USGS “Water Science for Schools” website. The address for the site’s ground-water-quality page is: http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/earthgwquality.html Natural filtering is a big topic. Some filtering takes place when water flows over the ground, such as when muddy water from a plowed field or… Read more »

Posted Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 by & filed under FAQs.

This seems like a pretty straightforward question, but there are some interesting issues that come up in making a response. First, the words "pure" and "natural" don't really mean the same thing. Pure water is a kind of theoretical concept, it means water that has nothing in it except H2O (hydrogen and oxygen). Absolutely pure… Read more »

Posted Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 by & filed under FAQs.

Nitrate (NO3) is a common inorganic form of nitrogen. Chemically, it is an anion with a single negative charge, consisting of one atom of nitrogen and three atoms of oxygen. Because it is an anion, it is soluble in water. Plants normally use nitrate as their source of the nitrogen needed by all living things,… Read more »

Posted Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 by & filed under FAQs.

The best way to learn about your local drinking water quality is to read the annual drinking water quality report/consumer confidence report that water suppliers now send out by July 1 of each year. The reports often are sent out with water bills, but they may be sent separately. The reports tell where drinking water… Read more »

Posted Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 by & filed under FAQs.

You can view a national map of hardness in surface water. Hardness data (reflecting mostly calcium, plus a little magnesium) for individual drinking-water suppliers is on the following pages: EPA Local Drinking Water Information It is important to note that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has not set a legal limit or standard for hardness… Read more »

Posted Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 by & filed under FAQs.

The USGS Water Science for Schools Web site has a link to “Water Science Glossary of Terms”. This page offers links to additional glossaries. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency also has a Drinking Water Glossary.